• Aug
    16
    Posted in:
    Posted by: Jarve Kaplan Granato Starr

    What are the Potential Risks on a Construction Site?

    Working on a construction site offers a lot of benefits, including the fact that the job is highly compensated and that you get the satisfaction of seeing the fruits of your labors. But with those benefits, there are also significant risks. Construction sites are dangerous places where people work at high elevations, hazardous materials are present, heavy equipment is used, and accidents frequently occur. It is the responsibility of your employer, as well as the construction site owner, other contractors, and equipment manufacturers to ensure that workers are protected. Below is a list of where some of the greatest dangers lie.

    • Falling from a high elevation – When employees are working on a scaffold or ladder, it is essential that appropriate protection is in place and that the worksite is properly planned and supervised. Scaffolds should be equipped with appropriate guard rails and safety nets should be in place where appropriate to minimize the impact of a fall.
    • Moving objects – One of the most constant hazards on a construction site is the frequent movement of construction vehicles, overhead lifting equipment, diggers and more. When you combine the limited visibility that the drivers of these vehicles work with and the uneven terrain that is frequently present, many construction site accidents involve being run over by a moving vehicle or caught between a stationary object and a moving object.
    • Slips, Trips and Falls – Slip and fall accidents may be associated with retail establishments, but they are a frequent cause of significant injuries on construction sites. The terrain is usually uneven and littered with unused materials, debris, and equipment that turn it into an obstacle course. Cables are a common site, and surfaces can be wet or slippery as a result of weather or the materials that are being used.
    • Collapsing trenches and structures – Many devastating construction site accidents start in trenches that collapse with workers inside or when buildings that are being built, renovated or demolished collapsing.
    • Electricity – The risk of being exposed to live electricity on a construction site is very real, either as a result of touching a specific live part or by touching or standing on a conducting material. Construction workers are frequently in close proximity to overhead and underground power cables and equipment, and electric shocks are common.

    If you are injured in a construction site accident, you may be entitled to pursue a personal injury lawsuit against those responsible for your injuries. Contact us today to learn more about your rights.

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